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Everything Everything: A Rare YA Book-Turned-Movie That Lives up to the Hype

Everything Everything: A Rare YA Book-Turned-Movie That Lives up to the Hype

The book blogging world gets excited about colorful new covers daily. I would know, because I'm part of it. So when Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon first came onto my feed, I hardly blinked. Another day, another novel. 

But its originality sets this one apart. The unique portrayal of SCID, short for Severe Combined Immunodeficiency, first lured me in. On top of that, I was impressed that Madeline, the protagonist, is biracial with an Asian mother and a black father. Being biracial myself, I'm well aware just how rare biracial representation is.

After devouring Everything, Everything, adjectives tumbled from my mind. Captivating. Original. Breathtaking. Delicious. A poetic and whimsical whirlwind of words danced around the pages that Nicola Yoon created. 

Readers might groan at ridiculous instant Shakespearian lovers, but don't worry: Everything, Everything manages to pull off instant love and young romance with a carefully crafted relationship between Madeline and Olly, sans cringe.

Interesting family dynamics rarely show up on a YA bookshelf, but in Nicola's masterpiece? The connection between Madeline and her mother experiences blooms and downfalls. And Carla! The nurse! The aunt figure! The wise Latina blossom! Read Everything, Everything if only for Carla. Truly. 

Unfortunately, not all is spotless and spiffy. Everything, Everything is undeniably entertaining—except for the disabled community. A narrative of ableism surfaces: you can’t have a happy ending if you’re still disabled.

Regardless, between the originality and creativity of plot and prose, and the winning themes, it's a must-read. Could the movie, which just hit theaters, top the book? I had to find out for myself.

I loved witnessing beloved characters and scenes onscreen. From the dainty details of Madeline’s life to the fantastical theme of the ocean, this movie transforms pages into action. Bless the casting agents behind the book because Amandla Stenberg shines. Amandla Stenberg smiling. Amandla Stenberg in the color yellow. Amandla Stenberg and Nick Robinson (!).

The movie forgets no details. Madeline’s clothes and rooms glimmer with artistic particulars. Words mirror the novel; verbatim quotes stand out with familiarity. New characters are introduced, too. In the novel, Madeline models a teeny astronaut in her architecture projects. In the movie, Madeline’s imagination makes the astronaut come alive.

Madeline’s ethnicity was a key factor for diverse readers in the novel, and that continues onto the screen. Instead of an Asian mother and a black father, Maddy has a black mother and a white father. Even so, biracial portrayal is appreciated. 

The movie carefully covered Nicola Yoon’s writing in almost every other aspect. Undeniably, the Everything, Everything movie is a delight to the diverse, the romantic, and the readers. So, what are you waiting for? Grab your friends and go to the movies.

By Becca Stevenson, 16

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